Whirled Musings

Across the Universe with Cosmic Connie, aka Connie L. Schmidt...or maybe just through the dung-filled streets and murky swamps of pop culture -- more specifically, the New-Age/New-Wage crowd, pop spirituality & religion, pop psychology, self(ish)-help, business babble, media silliness, & related (or occasionally unrelated) matters of consequence. Hope you're wearing boots. (By the way, the "Cosmic" bit in my moniker is IRONIC.)

Friday, November 13, 2009

The Mayans called. They want their calendar back.

12/21/2012 will be so uneventful that it’ll make Y2K look like the Harmonic Convergence.
~Steven Sashen

I wasn't going to even write about 2012. Really I wasn't, mainly because the topic has already been covered so well by some of my fellow wags and social commentators, such as the above-quoted Steven Sashen. Like most of them, I've known about the 2012 hysteria for many years, long before it actually became hysteria. For that matter, I was hip to it long before the Y2K panic became a panic. I first became cognizant of 2012 predictions way back when the world was still recovering from the utter letdown that was the Harmonic Convergence (the latter of which I mentioned in passing, along with one of the countless "ascensions" related to the number 11, in an old piece I wrote for Skeptical Inquirer).

I knew about 2012 by virtue of having friends, and later clients, who were into New-Agey stuff and were fascinated with the Mayan calendar and the usual hodgepodge of ancient prophecies. One of my clients, who later became a friend, did some channeling occasionally, and some of her Guides told her all sorts of stuff about massive catastrophic changes coming in 2012. One told her the s--t would actually start hitting the fan some time in 2009, and it would just begin escalating steadily for the next three years, culminating in the Big Whatever of 2012.

In the past couple of years, as it became apparent that 2012 was the new Y2K, I toyed with the idea of doing a blog post about it. Other topics captured my interest more, though, and I let it slide.

But now comes the new disaster flick, 2012, which opened in theaters across the United States today. (It's fitting, I suppose, that it would be on a Friday the 13th.) So far the movie critics have been less than kind, although reg'lar viewers have tended to cut the movie a little more slack. I'm pretty easy on movies myself, and will probably see 2012 at some point after it comes out on DVD; I've enjoyed several of director Roland Emmerich's other works, and I adore John Cusack, despite the fact that he may have some woo-ish leanings himself. During yesterday's interview on CBS' Early Show, Harry Smith asked John if he had been aware of the 2012 hoopla before he got involved in the movie. John said yeah, he'd been into that stuff for years. Here's a link to the video of that interview, which has become famous in its own right for the fact that the f-word just sort of popped out of John's mouth (at about 2:45 into the video).

In the past several months I've been seeing some more acerbic commentary about this whole 2012 thing. I don't know if any of it will make a dent in the growing hysteria, but I applaud the writers' efforts nonetheless. In October, Mark Stevenson published a piece on the MyWay site about how disgusted many people of Mayan descent are about the 2012 phenomenon. Astronomers are pretty irate as well.

At Cornell University, Ann Martin, who runs the "Curious? Ask an Astronomer" Web site, says people are scared.

"It's too bad that we're getting e-mails from fourth-graders who are saying that they're too young to die," Martin said. "We had a mother of two young children who was afraid she wouldn't live to see them grow up."

Chile Pixtun, a Guatemalan, says the doomsday theories spring from Western, not Mayan ideas.

A significant time period for the Mayas does end on the date, and enthusiasts have found a series of astronomical alignments they say coincide in 2012, including one that happens roughly only once every 25,800 years.

But most archaeologists, astronomers and Maya say the only thing likely to hit Earth is a meteor shower of New Age philosophy, pop astronomy, Internet doomsday rumors and TV specials such as one on the History Channel which mixes "predictions" from Nostradamus and the Mayas and asks: "Is 2012 the year the cosmic clock finally winds down to zero days, zero hope?"

Although 2012 does have some archeological significance, which Stevenson explains in his article, it's just not gonna be the end of the world as we know it.

More recently, on the h+ Magazine site, Mark Dery wrote a scathing piece, 2012: Carnival of Bunkum. He rips into 2012 "expert" Daniel Pinchbeck (whose asininity has had my pal Chris Locke at the Mystic B blog tearing his own hair out for quite some time now). Dery writes:

But the worst of the 2012 bandwagon, epitomized by Pinchbeck’s lectures and writings, is the blithe cultural arrogance and staggering anthropological ignorance evident in the movement’s appropriation of Mayan beliefs and history. In a discussion hosted by Pinchbeck’s online magazine Reality Sandwich, the cultural theorist Erik Davis puts his finger on the minstrelsy implicit in the ventriloquization, by white, first-world New Agers, of the Maya. “[I]t seems to me that there is very little concrete sense of what ‘the Mayans’ (whoever that grand abstraction represents) thought about what would happen in the human world on 2012,” he writes. “To my mind it is kinda disrespectful to the Mayans to force them into our own narrative.”

Dery also talked to journalist Xeni Jardin, who does not claim to be an expert on or spokesperson for the Mayan people. However, her adoptive father is "of indigenous descent," and Xeni's work with his nonprofit organization in Guatemala to make things better for the poorest of the poor there has brought her in close contact with the Mayans. Here's what she had to say about Pinchbeck:

What makes me angriest about Pinchbeck’s bogus, profiteering bullsh-t isn’t so much him, but the fact that that many people are racist enough to believe any asshole white guy who declares himself an expert in Mayan culture. Did it ever occur to anyone to ask practicing Maya priests out in the villages? [...] It absolutely enrages me that while people I know in Guatemala, traditional priests, are struggling to figure out how to provide clean drinking water to their families, how to feed their communities, how to avoid being shot by the gangs and thieves that plague the roads more than ever---while they’re struggling to survive and keep their communities intact, assholes like Pinchbeck are making a buck off of white man’s parodies of their culture.

Of course, Native Americans have been hollering for years about the wholesale exploitation of their culture and religious traditions by New-Wage hustlers and their followers, the latest newsworthy example being James Arthur Ray's infamous Death Lodge. In fact, the Lakota tribes of North and South Dakota have just filed a lawsuit against James Ray, the owners of the Angel Valley Resort, the state of Arizona and the United States. Here is a PDF of the pleading. (And years before Sweatgate there were other disasters, not only with sweat lodges but with large-scale New-Wagey events such as the increasingly ludicrous Burning Man.)

But back to 2012. Despite the serious efforts of people such as Mark Dery and Mark Stevenson, people are going to believe what they want to believe. Almost certainly the silliness will continue unabated, and perhaps the best way to fight it is with yet more silliness. I kind of like Steven Sashen's approach. He has a mighty prophecy of what will occur on December 22, 2012, which is the day after the world is supposed to end.

...when the “planetary alignment” occurs, without the warned-about mayhem, here’s how the 12-ers will spin it:

“YOU DID IT, HUMANITY! You made the shift in consciousness that we needed to avert disaster and have ushered in a new era in global connection and enlightenment.”

One of his readers responded:

What’s amusing to me is that there’s pretty solid proof that the Mayan Calendar was created several hundred years after year zero. i.e., the makers extrapolated back to make things fit the way they wanted to. So year zero is completely arbitrary, just like year zero in CE calendars is arbitrary (seeing as how Jesus was probably born in 4 BC).

Here's my prophecy about 2012: The one thing the movie about it will accomplish, besides making big bucks at the box office, will be to finally bring the conversation even more into the mainstream. It will give the talking heads and the blogging hands something to talk about and blog about, and it will give the worrying public something else to worry about for a while, until the next trendy worry du jour comes along. End-timers of the New-Wage sort will come forward with still more products to help humanity through this "transition." (I wouldn't be surprised if Joe "Mr. Fire" Vitale, for example, came out with his own exploitation project – perhaps a moviemercial about "Hypnotic Marketing Secrets of the Mystical Maya." After all, he went to Peru last summer and got photographed looking deeply wise in Machu Picchu. That has to be good for at least one infoproduct. It would be just the thing to add to his world series of magickal offerings, such as the Russian Wish Dolly and the Polish Money Attractor.) Meanwhile, end-timers of the Christian fundamentalist kind will righteously assert that Jeezus H. Christ Himself said we don't know the hour or the day the world will end, but that in any event we shouldn't be listening to those pagan Mayans.

And the Whirled will just keep right on spinning.

PS ~ Here's the Wikipedia entry on 2012.
And here's the even more authoritative Uncyclopedia entry.

Labels: ,

36 Comments:

Blogger savage71 said...

For centuries, there have been greedy crackers out there more than happy to exploit the beliefs, lands, cultures and bodies of black and brown people.

(I started actually referring to certain types of white people by that name, thanks to Bill Hicks).

A friend showed me a website that lists (with references) all the dates that the world was supposed to end. I got to thinking, perhaps humanity actually wants to be done with this whole thing. I mean, we have been here for thousands of years, not really knowing why. Could it be that we are actually just sick of the ride, and want to get off?

That thought occurs to me on my more cynical days. The rest of the time I just think we are as silly species, confused in the dark.

Friday, November 13, 2009 11:52:00 PM  
Anonymous Lana said...

"Did it ever occur to anyone to ask practicing Maya priests out in the villages? [...] It absolutely enrages me that while people I know in Guatemala, traditional priests, are struggling to figure out how to provide clean drinking water to their families, how to feed their communities, how to avoid being shot by the gangs and thieves that plague the roads more than ever---while they’re struggling to survive and keep their communities intact, assholes like Pinchbeck are making a buck off of white man’s parodies of their culture."

Powerful words.

I read Pinchbeck's "Breaking Open the Head" several years ago, when I was exploring the scientific basis of mystical experiences. I haven't kept up with him, but now I'm curious...

Saturday, November 14, 2009 3:04:00 PM  
Anonymous disillusioned said...

I came to the conclusion that it is a product of our boredom, our endless wait in the Bardo. The delicious illicit thrill of impending doom does wonders to enliven the boredom. We are a species of drama queens who find belief in our own horror stories preferable to the mundane reality of a life and death devoid of meaning.
Not to get too depressing about it, it is a random universe to which we bring meaning. To some, the prospect of the sky falling in is meaningful and gives life purpose.
And the 2012 film trailer that I saw on the net was quite exciting, but then I am a closet drama queen too.

Saturday, November 14, 2009 4:05:00 PM  
Blogger Cosmic Connie said...

It's true, S71, that indigenous peoples have always been exploited by others -- in some cases, by other indigenous peoples.

As for our end-of-days obsession, that seems to be every bit as much a part of the human experience as the vision (or memory, some would say) of a lost paradise. We seem to have a need to tell ourselves stories, and the stories must have a clear structure: a beginning, a middle, and an end.

Some spiritual traditions think in terms of shorter and longer cycles, and the larger story is never-ending. One great cycle ends, another begins. And so it goes, on and on and on and on forever.

Others, like Christianity in its most common form, seem bent on a true end-of-days episode, followed by blissful eternal paradise for the "saved" and eternal torment for the "unsaved." For believers of this type there never seems to be much elaboration on what eternity will be like once the world has ended. What will happen next? That's the question they seem unwilling to consider, except to say that we don't know anything beyond the fact that it's either bliss or torment, and you'd better take your pick while you still have a chance. Accept Jeezus now, and all that.

I think you nailed it when you said we are just a "silly species, confused in the dark." Silly we are, and my guess is that when they're not running scared from us, all of the other animals are laughing at us -- but we're too full of ourselves to pick up on it.

Saturday, November 14, 2009 6:01:00 PM  
Anonymous disillusioned said...

Sorry Connie, I think my post would have made sense had I posted the beginning of it, rather than starting in the middle--which aptly demonstrates your point about the need for beginnings, middles and ends to our stories if they are to be coherent.
I won't bore you with a reconstruction of the lost beginning, but I do think we should give the Mayans their calendar back and butt out of others cultures until we learn some respect for those cultures.

Saturday, November 14, 2009 8:38:00 PM  
Blogger mpress said...

Connie, I enjoy your writing very much - and your humour regarding these issues, even when they are very serious.

But I'm surprised to see you pointing to Steven Sashen as another commentator - isn't he as much of a hustledork (to use your term) as Mr. Fire, or Anthony Robbins, or any other number of new age "teachers"?

I'm immediately suspicious of any writer that uses the term "quantum," especially if it's not followed by "mechanics" or "physics" - Steve's "Quantum Wealth" (geez, I could increase my wealth by several thousand quanta all day long and not add a single penny to my bank account) and his "I AM" meditation don't look that much different to me than any other web-based internet marketer.

Am I missing something here?

And yes, I am also disappointed in all the hoopla surrounding 2012. While Y2K had very serious ramifications - and those were avoided by a lot of hard work - this is no more serious than hitting December 31 on our own calendar. Turn the page, and another long count begins.

Saturday, November 14, 2009 9:38:00 PM  
Blogger Cosmic Connie said...

Hi, Lana, good to see you here. I'm sure that some of Pinchbeck's work is interesting (I've only read bits of it here and there), but he's no Terence McKenna ("Food of the Gods") or even Aldous Huxley ("The Doors of Perception"), for that matter. But I imagine Pinchbeck will be getting lots of attention over the next three years or so...at least until December 22, 2012.

An interesting author who deals in somewhat related subject matter is Ronald K. Siegel, M.D. (We may have discussed his books here or privately; I don't remember.) I found his book, "Intoxication" to be fascinating, as well as "Fire in the Brain: Clinical Tales of Hallucination." The latter book is sometimes very unpleasant reading, but gives some eye-opening insight into the mind.

Saturday, November 14, 2009 10:38:00 PM  
Blogger Cosmic Connie said...

disillusioned said...

"I came to the conclusion that [our obsession with doomsday] is a product of our boredom, our endless wait in the Bardo. The delicious illicit thrill of impending doom does wonders to enliven the boredom. We are a species of drama queens who find belief in our own horror stories preferable to the mundane reality of a life and death devoid of meaning."

That makes sense to me too. I think we're mostly torn between being deathly afraid of the Great Unknown, and being afraid of getting stuck forever in the figurative boring, tiny desert town our lives may have become. I used to love to quote a chapter title in a book by Texas humorist Joe Bob Briggs. I don't recall the name of the book (it might have been "Iron Joe Bob"), but the name of the chapter was "Things We Do To Forget We're Doomed." The problem is that some of these things get kind of boring, and some become so boring that getting worked into a lather over doomsday starts looking pretty sexy. Then we get scared again and run to safety, till safety gets boring, and it can go on like that for a long time.

For others, boredom is fought by going to long grueling self-help weekends (I've long said that much of selfish-help is just an expensive form of entertainment). For some unlucky few who go to these events, however, that's *their* doomsday.

I'm a closet drama queen too, so 2012 (the movie) will probably be right up my alley.

Saturday, November 14, 2009 10:53:00 PM  
Blogger Cosmic Connie said...

Mpress, you ask a very logical and reasonable question. It's one I've been asked before on this forum, as a matter of fact. And I am going to give you a very illogical and possibly unreasonable answer.

I like Steven and I think he's funny. I know about the other stuff he's into, but friendship can go a long way towards making those differences unimportant. (I have other friends who are into various sorts of woo-ish-ness. I also have friends who are Republicans or conservatives.) Steven himself is certainly welcome to pop in and speak for himself.

And, after all, I'm only quoting Steven's funny posts; I'm not endorsing his esoteric stuff, nor am I sending or referring anyone to him for any "quantum" services or other woo-seeming things.

Steven may very well be one of those who has two feet in two very different and contradictory worlds. This may or may not be a cause for conflict within himself. Or maybe he sees no contradiction and really believes the stuff he teaches *is* better than the average run-of-the-mill self-improvement material. Then again, perhaps he's just being facetious all the way across the board, just to see how long he can get away with it. If so, Steven, nice trick.

I know that in the past there have been those who were disappointed in me or even a little irate at me for not calling Steven out on his inconsistencies. But I have enjoyed what he brings to the conversation here and on other blogs. And for those who are disappointed that I am not tearing Steven a new one, he has a special message: "I already got me a new one. I found it at Costco. They have EVERYTHING."

So anyway... thanks for your concern, mpress, but I don't think Steven presents any sort of problem whatsoever here.

Saturday, November 14, 2009 11:10:00 PM  
Blogger savage71 said...

"We want out calendar back"

"You can't have it. It's not yours anymore...it's Mayan..."

(rimshot, please)

Sunday, November 15, 2009 3:29:00 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

So if Vitale was still your friend, youd leave him alone?

Sunday, November 15, 2009 8:27:00 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Best thing about Pinchbeck's book is it may help to promote Ibogaine, which seems to me to be much needed by a lot of people.

Sunday, November 15, 2009 12:38:00 PM  
Blogger mpress said...

Thanks for your answer Connie. I am neither disappointed nor irate, but I was curious as to why Steven gets a pass when others don't - now I know. I appreciate you taking the time to give me such a complete and honest answer.

And maybe Steven is selling products he believes in, rather than doing multi-level marketing (buy this product, so you can be ready for the next, necessary, really, really important - and way more expensive thing - I'm going to sell you!!)

Whatever cognitive dissonance remains is for me - and Steven - to sort out.

Thanks again for taking the time and for helping me to understand. It is appreciated.

Sunday, November 15, 2009 1:41:00 PM  
Blogger Cosmic Connie said...

Marvelous synchronicity, Anon. Just last night, Ron and I watched an episode of "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit," that featured ibogaine as a cure for heroin addiction.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ibogaine

Sunday, November 15, 2009 1:59:00 PM  
Blogger Cosmic Connie said...

The comment system is clogged up again... I don't know if it's the fault of Blogger or my email account, or if there are glitches with our satellite Internet service due to storms in the area, but apparently I haven't been receiving the comments in the order in which they were originally sent. So, just for clarification: my comment about Ibogaine was in response to Anon 12:38 PM above.

Sunday, November 15, 2009 11:13:00 PM  
Blogger Cosmic Connie said...

savage71 3:29 AM said...

"'We want out calendar back'

"'You can't have it. It's not yours anymore...it's Mayan...'"

You won't get any groans from me. Puns are heartily encouraged around here!

Sunday, November 15, 2009 11:17:00 PM  
Blogger Cosmic Connie said...

Anonymous 8:27 AM said...

"So if Vitale was still your friend, youd leave him alone?"

Is that a trick question? :-)

Let me guess: You're either (1) A friend or fan of JV (surely not one of the Sigloids?); (2) bored with my JV snarks and wishing I'd find someone more interesting to write about; or (3) idly curious about my criteria for choosing snargets.

In any case it *is* a trick question, though you may not have intended it to be so, because I am not sure I could retain a friendship with anyone who said and did what I consider to be eminently snarkworthy things on a consistent basis.

Sunday, November 15, 2009 11:28:00 PM  
Blogger Cosmic Connie said...

mpress (1:41) said:
"Thanks again for taking the time and for helping me to understand. It is appreciated."

You're welcome, mp. I don't claim to be completely consistent on my blog or in my "real" life, and I'm always trying to sort stuff out. I appreciate having my own seeming inconsistencies pointed out to me, because it gives me a chance to reconsider my views, and that's always healthy.

As for Steven, I imagine he's continually sorting things out as well. But from what I've seen, he tends to take criticism with pretty good humor.

Sunday, November 15, 2009 11:35:00 PM  
Blogger Cosmic Connie said...

disillusioned 8:38 PM said...

"Sorry Connie, I think my post would have made sense had I posted the beginning of it, rather than starting in the middle--which aptly demonstrates your point about the need for beginnings, middles and ends to our stories if they are to be coherent..."

Hey, no worries, Dis. You're not the one screwing up here. It's Blogger/Juno/the satellite Internet service or SOMETHING, but it's not you. Anyway, point well taken about how we should butt out of others' cultures until we learn true respect for them.

I know I've linked to this old essay of mine scads of times before, but heck, why not do it again just for good measure. (There's actually a defense of Western/European culture in there along with the gripes about the obsession with indigenous cultures.)
http://home.swbell.net/moonshad/wet-blanket.html

(Those of you who have already seen this old piece dozens of times and are sick of it, please accept my sincere apologies.)

Sunday, November 15, 2009 11:44:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Oh right, what did they say about Ibogaine, Connie?

Monday, November 16, 2009 4:38:00 PM  
Blogger Cosmic Connie said...

Anon 4:38 PM: What did who say about Ibogaine? I think I need a drug to improve my short-term memory... ;-)

Anyway. I have no idea what Daniel Pinchbeck said about Ibogaine, but the Wikipedia link is here...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ibogaine

...and the "Law And Order ~ Special Victims Unit" episode I mentioned involved a young junkie who supposedly got clean with a medically supervised dose of Ibogaine, which at this time is not legal in the U.S. In the episode, the doctor risked his license by turning himself in after administering the dose, and he only got his license suspended for a month, and the young man got clean, and it was a happy ending (except for the dead girl). Sorry about the spoiler.

Anyway, as we were watching the show, Ron asked, "I wonder if Ibogaine really exists." I thought it might, since these shows are usually based at least loosely on reality. But I was too lazy to look it up. And then Anon 12:38 PM's comment about Ibogaine came in, so I diligently researched it by typing "Ibogaine Wikipedia" in the search field, and voila.

You're welcome.

Monday, November 16, 2009 5:06:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I am surprised cool dudes you haven't heard of it, so I think that's some effective knowledge suppression, but if you check it on you tube etc, there is an ever growing body of testimonials as to it's value, and I think if Pinchbeck helps publicise something so beneficial then it makes up for a lot of the baloney he may spout :)

Monday, November 16, 2009 5:25:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

A nice happy ending!

Monday, November 16, 2009 7:38:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

You know there seems to be some sort of Gorbachev/2012 connection, have you picked up on that?

Tuesday, November 17, 2009 3:39:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

OK, never mind Gorbachev, what do you expect for 2012 CC?

Thursday, November 19, 2009 6:12:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Do you thnk everything will just asplode on 2012 like it says here in the uncyclopedia?

http://uncyclopedia.wikia.com/wiki/2012

Thursday, November 19, 2009 6:15:00 PM  
Blogger Karl said...

For those contemplating a bit of guru devotion
you can download a free pdf

http://www.strippingthegurus.com/


This is not really apropos to this thread but since its the latest post....

Friday, November 20, 2009 11:25:00 PM  
Blogger Cosmic Connie said...

Anonymous 5:25 PM said...

"I am surprised cool dudes you haven't heard of it, so I think that's some effective knowledge suppression, but if you check it on you tube etc, there is an ever growing body of testimonials as to it's value, and I think if Pinchbeck helps publicise something so beneficial then it makes up for a lot of the baloney he may spout :)"

==
I believe Anon is referring to the above-referenced Ibogaine, and may have a good point about Pinchbeck. I'm not suggesting that Pinchbeck's entire body of work is without merit. I'm just sayin' that the 2012 crap is, well, mostly crap. (Also, I'm not surprised that *I* hadn't previously heard of Ibogaine b/c I haven't been keeping up on addiction research.)

Saturday, November 21, 2009 11:09:00 AM  
Blogger Cosmic Connie said...

Anonymous 7:38 PM said...

"A nice happy ending!"

==
CC: Well, except for the dead girl [on the Law & Order episode], as I noted above. :-)

==

Anonymous 3:39 PM said...

"You know there seems to be some sort of Gorbachev/2012 connection, have you picked up on that?"

CC: I'm picking up more Putin vibes than Gorbachev vibes, but then, that's just the kind of mystical, part-Russian gal that I am.
http://cosmicconnie.blogspot.com/2009/09/russian-to-judgment.html

==
Anonymous 6:12 PM said...

"OK, never mind Gorbachev, what do you expect for 2012 CC?"

CC: I expect huge after-Apocalypse sales on products all over the Internet, beginning on December 22. Christmas that year will be an anti-climax for some, an extra-joyful celebration for others ("We did it, humanity!" -- as Steven Sashen predicted).

Saturday, November 21, 2009 11:19:00 AM  
Blogger Cosmic Connie said...

Karl said...

"For those contemplating a bit of guru devotion you can download a free pdf

http://www.strippingthegurus.com/

"This is not really apropos to this thread but since its the latest post.."

Thank you, Karl, and it's quite apropos, since one of the themes of this blog is exposing the man (or woman) behind the curtain. Or under the robe, as the case may be. Or... well, let's not get too heavily into anything that will bring up unpleasant visuals. :-) As it happens, I linked to that very PDF on a blog post here some time ago...
http://cosmicconnie.blogspot.com/2007/11/beast-meets-west-part-1.html

...but am happy to do so again.

And just for good measure, here 'tis once more:
http://www.strippingthegurus.com/

Saturday, November 21, 2009 11:25:00 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Post 2012 sales, I hadn't thought of that angle.
Maybe if you deal in second hand fall out shelters...

It looks like good business for the 2012 thing leading up to it, but I would think that anyone selling a post 2012 apocalypse vision will instantly have the edge in the market pretty soon after.
Do you think it may be better to avoid the rush and start preparing for a post 2012 market? Let the clowns try to compete in a prophecy glut but clean up afterwards?
I can't think of any dates that would be good contenders, myself, and it's another 900 odd years till the next millenium.

Saturday, November 21, 2009 5:27:00 PM  
Blogger Karl said...

The 2012 prediction fest is well on its way.

http://www.2012predictionsandprophecy.com

Sunday, November 22, 2009 2:20:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I see. On oct 28, 2011 the tree of life will reach it's highest energy level ever, according to unnamed Mayan elders, according to the hustle video.
Hm.

I don't know if these folks have really got their business figured out, because I still think that the post 2012 field will be clear for exploitation- much more than the pre 2012 one. After all 2012 has much more momentum than this fantastic new 2011 date.

Another point that I am pondering- possibly separate to the big 2012 issue is... what is Chris Locke driving at with his hindu/new age/nazi nexus?

He's probing deeply but do we have to buy the same books he reads to get his point ur wut?

Sunday, November 22, 2009 10:08:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

But wait, right at the bottom of the page is a woman who has a book about what life will be like after 2012.
I was assuming that we are all supposed to die in 2012, forgetting (how could I), that it will be a transformative event, not a deadly one.
Tut.

Sunday, November 22, 2009 10:15:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I went to see the film last night. It's fairly good, but a little repetetive, with an attempt at political comment. It's pretty funny when the Earth is being destroyed and the guy's wife starts up a conversation on where their relationship is going.
The graphics are awesome, but I think you don't necessarily need them for a good disaster movie.

Wednesday, November 25, 2009 2:50:00 PM  
Blogger Bob said...

This woo woo stuff about the end of the world in 2012 just because the mMyan calendar stops then is amusing.
Perhaps we need to step back into history and find out just why the Mayans stopped the calendar when they did.
Maybe it went something like this:

Mayan Chief - "Hey Calendar Guru."

Calendar Guru - "Yes, Boss."

Mayan Chief - "You've been working on that for a while now. Funding's about gone. How about you wrap it up for, say, 2012, oh I don't know, December 21, or something."

Calendar Guru - "Sure, Boss. What you want me to do after that?"

Mayan Chief - "The techie guys have a problem with something they call a 'crystal skull'. They just can't seem to get their heads around it. You think you can give them a hand with it?"

Calendar Guru - "Sure, Boss. Just need to chisel out these last hylogryphics."

Mayan Chief - "Cool."

Wednesday, January 27, 2010 4:26:00 PM  

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